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New cooperative FFG research project: AYUDO

The project AYUDO (Spanish: „I assist”) aims to support elderly or chronically ill people by digitizing their health data in order to be able to take early and regular measures to preserve or improve their health. The focus is on recording and supporting one’s own management of those factors that have a positive effect on physical and mental well-being and influence one’s own performance and resilience.

An integrated personal digital health record with health data from the medical and domestic environment currently does not exist in Austria.  AYUDO would like to realize exactly this and integrate already distributed stored digital health data, such as vital data, lifestyle data, wellbeing data or also medication, intake or findings data of an elderly or chronically ill person in the longer term in his/her ‘Personal Digital Health File’. This ‘collection’ should also be continuously supplemented as barrier-free as possible through new, intelligent services for personal health management.

Interoperability and data security play an important role in the architecture of the planned technical solution. Interfaces to user’s individual digital data sources should be flexibly adaptable. It should also be possible to supplement health data that is not digitally available as barrier-free as possible via suitable user interfaces.

In addition to conventional interaction models, natural language interaction models are also to be developed. The aim is to investigate the acceptance and security of these blended solutions for the AAL sector. End users will be strongly involved in development and evaluation activities.

AYUDO aims to increase the quality of life of elderly, chronically ill or multimorbid people by improving their self-assessment of their own state of health and self-prevention. If desired, access rights to AYUDO services can also be transferred to the social environment (care and nursing). We expect new findings and results in particular in the following areas:

  • use cases of a personal digital health record through new intelligent services;
  • application, acceptance and security of (blended) digital language assistance for AAL solutions;
  • helpful communication/visualization of health data for patients and caregivers;
  • flexible integration of individually already available, distributed, inhomogeneous, non-integrated and incomplete digitalized health data;

contact: Dr. Claudia Steinberger

project start: October 2019 – September 2022

project partners: AINF/AAU (coordination), ISYS/AAU, Groiss Informatics, FH Kärnten, Klinikum Klagenfurt

 

Der Beitrag New cooperative FFG research project: AYUDO erschien zuerst auf University of Klagenfurt.

Source: AAU TEWI

“O Canada” – Part 3

In her third post on this year’s excursion to Canada, Tamara Urach journals the group’s time in Montréal, the final stop on the students’ tour.

Montréal – Excusez-moi, parlez-vous Anglais?

Our third and last stop is probably the most French-infused location of North America – Montréal. We start our program on the day following our arrival on June 2, with our first point on the agenda being a two-hour historical group tour of Vieux-Montréal, where we also witness French-Canadians taking the French way of (love) life very seriously.

Other stops on our city tour lead us to the Stewart Museum and the Pointe-à-Callière Archaeological Museum, as well as the wonderful Château Ramezay, where the tour guides show us not only the artefacts in the museum, but also an awesome garden with plants used for different medicinal purposes. Another garden that some of us decide to visit is the Botanical Garden of Montréal, where the Chinese Garden and Native Garden amaze visitors everyday. Our question about where Mother Earth is (a beautiful living sculpture at the gardens, which is in fact, nowhere to be found), only earns amazed and confused faces.

Nature is also present on the Mont Royal, name giver of Montréal, which is more of a hill rather than a mountain (we might not want to tell the Québécoise). Nevertheless, the Mont Royal is a nice place for a relaxed afternoon, even some squirrels and a racoon begging for food cross our way both up and down the hill. Another highlight on the penultimate day is our group dinner at the Vieux-Port Steakhouse, where we apparently forget about money saving and decide to enjoy an extraordinary meal – French onion soup, steak, salmon fillet and delicious desserts such as crème brûlée and chocolate mousse cake are just some of the meals worth mentioning. After some drinks at a bar, we are all ready to go to sleep and rest before some individual activities on our last day, June 7. Some of us visit the Notre Dame Basilica in Montréal, others decide to make one last shopping trip at the Eaton Centre, before we gather for our trip to the airport at 3 p.m.

After a long flight back to Venice, we safely arrive at the airport and take our bus back to Austria. It’s always nice to come home to your loved ones. Canada and our trip there will for sure stay in our hearts, and suitcases full of souvenirs and minds full of fun memories will always remind us of this extraordinary trip.

Text and photos by Tamara Urach

Der Beitrag “O Canada” – Part 3 erschien zuerst auf University of Klagenfurt.

Source: AAU TEWI

Language in politics: Why some act the strict father

USA | Foto: Maksym Yemelyanov/Fotolia.com

The communication practised by politicians is highly calculated, supporting their aim to transport their own messages and to sway the voters. Applying a linguistic  perspective,  Marta Degani has studied speeches by US-American politicians, including election addresses by Barack Obama, but also by Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

“In the United States, political communication is conducted in a highly professionalized manner. Very little is left to chance”, Marta Degani (Department of English and American Studies) reports. Her research, along with additional studies by colleagues, has shown that numerous US-American politicians draw upon two “idealised” cognitive models in their language. These can be traced back to the linguist George Lakoff, who works with the model of the “strict father”  and  the “nurturant parent”. While the former model is based on authority, a hierarchical distribution of power, and a compelling leadership figure, the latter is characterised by equality, a horizontal distribution of power, and mutual solicitude. Depending on the socio-cultural setting in which someone grows up, she or he will favour one or the other model. “When politicians avail themselves of the most suitable respective model, when they use certain metaphors and concepts and tell matching “stories”, listeners are more likely to feel affected.”  Using this theory as a lens, Marta Degani analysed the election speeches held by Barack Obama during the 2008 campaign, and came to a clear conclusion: “The role of the “nurturant parent” corresponds to his political credo.”

The art of “storytelling” as a communicative strategy has an important part to play in political communication. Here, too, Barack Obama serves as a good example, according to Marta Degani. “He tells various stories: About himself, about his provenance, his family, but he also tells stories about ordinary  American citizens. In addition, there are stories that depict America as a great nation.” When asked whether European politicians are also adept at telling stories, Degani responds: “Yes, though maybe not quite as skilled as their peers in the United States.”

Political language is heavily influenced by the prevailing culture. This is the case on a regional level, but it is also true historically. Marta Degani’s current observations have detected a trend towards anti-intellectualism, which is emerging as a social phenomenon, and is occasionally rendered visible in the shape of certain types of political populism. She found interesting proof of this in the so-called “announcement speeches” held by Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump in 2015, when they announced that they were running as presidential candidates. Degani used “readability tests” to examine the complexity of these addresses. One of the results: “Donald Trump’s speech can be comprehended by a 10-year-old child.” Here is another example using figures: “12 percent of the words in Clinton’s address are complex, while in Trump’s case, only 7.7 percent of words are complex. Moreover, on average, Clinton’s sentences consist of 16 words, while Trumps are comprised of 10.”

Marta Degani. 2015. Framing the Rhetoric of a Leader. An Analysis of Obama´s Election Campaign Speeches. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Marta Degani. 2016. Endangered Intellect: A case study of Clinton vs Trump Campaign Discourse. Iperstoria. 8, 131-145. (http://www.iperstoria.it/joomla/images/PDF/Numero_8/generale_8/Degani.pdf)

 

Der Beitrag Language in politics: Why some act the strict father erschien zuerst auf University of Klagenfurt.

Source: AAU TEWI

“O Canada” – Part 2

In the second post of a four-part series, student Tamara Urach journals about a recent student excursion to Canada. This week, it’s all about the group’s experiences in Ottawa.

Ottawa – Could you show me the way to the capital?

After spending five nights in Toronto, our trip continued to Ottawa, the capital of Canada. Compared to Toronto, the city is rather small and does not immediately remind us of a typical capital city, but it is charming either way. Our program starts with the Canadian Museum of History on May 31st and continues with the Parliament, the Canadian War Museum and the National Gallery on the following days. One tour that is particuarly exciting is the Canadian War Museum, not only because our tour guide is so knowledgeable, but also because he presents the artefacts and information in a way that could make students whose least favourite topic is history, love history!

Ottawa is also a great place to explore today’s Canada on your own, although it is rather small. One place we visit several times is the Byward Market, where you not only find good food and a variety of different cuisines, but also souvenirs, and the possibility to go out in the evening. Others take the opportunity to marvel at the Rideau Canal and the characteristic “stairs” where the canal is lowered to the same level as the one of the Ottawa River. Although Ottawa is not what most of us had in our minds before arriving in Canada’s capital, it was a lovely city.

Text and photos by Tamara Urach

Der Beitrag “O Canada” – Part 2 erschien zuerst auf University of Klagenfurt.

Source: AAU TEWI

Daniel Krenn and Annika Wille received their habilitation certificate

This year, two colleagues at our faculty defended successfully their habilitation thesis. Daniel Krenn, Department of Mathematics, received the venia docendi in Mathematics, and Annika Wille, Department of Mathematics Education, the venia docendi for Mathematics Education. The certificate was presented on June 17 by the Dean Gerhard Friedrich and the Vice Dean Clemens Heuberger.

Congratulations to our young colleagues for their excellent work and contributions to the field of Mathematics and Mathematics education!

Der Beitrag Daniel Krenn and Annika Wille received their habilitation certificate erschien zuerst auf University of Klagenfurt.

Source: AAU TEWI

“O Canada” – Part 1

This semester, 18 students from the University of Klagenfurt took part in René Schallegger’s seminar “The Founding of Canada: Development from Settlement to Nation.” As part of the seminar, the students went on an exciting two-week excursion to Canada to learn more about the country’s history. During this time, they stayed in three different cities, beginning their journey in Toronto, before journeying on to Ottawa and then finishing their stay in Montreal. In the first of a four-part series, Tamara Urach, a student on the teacher’s programme, shares the group’s experiences, starting in Toronto.

Toronto “Forever Yonge”

Venice, Saturday 25th May, 2:35 pm local time. Twenty students and staff members from the University of Klagenfurt are sitting on an airplane ready to take off on a great adventure – a fortnight in Canada. Some of us have already been there, but most of us haven’t and are extremely excited. It takes us roughly nine hours to arrive at Toronto Airport, where it’s 6 pm local time, and we are ready to continue our adventure the next day after some sleep.

Our five-day program in Toronto mainly takes place before midday, and consists of the Royal Ontario Museum, the Fort York Historical Site, the Art Gallery of Ontario and the Black Creek Pioneer Village. Two highlights are the tour at the Fort York Historical Site, where we get an insight into the lives of British and Canadian Soldiers fighting the war of 1812, and the tour at the Black Creek Pioneer Village, where the staff (including real life young Robert Baratheon) show us how newspapers were printed, how lanterns and wool were made and how people lived back then. Although these tours are extremely interesting (apart from the one or other dinosaur that refused to tell us about the history of the first nations), some of us also take the chance to get to know today’s Canada and visit some sights in the afternoon after lunch. Shopping tours at the Eaton Centre, visiting the Niagara Falls, the CN tower, Chinatown, the Distillery District, walking along the shores of Lake Ontario, taking a cruise on this very lake and visiting the Toronto Islands are just a few of the locations some of us decide to visit. Toronto is indeed a great mixture of green parks and big city life, so everyone is able to do whatever is most interesting to them.

  

Text by Tamara Urach / Photos by Tamara Urach and Natilly Macartney

Der Beitrag “O Canada” – Part 1 erschien zuerst auf University of Klagenfurt.

Source: AAU TEWI

On June 17, Daniel Krenn and Annika Wille received their habilitation certificate

Photo: Dean Gerhard Friedrich, Andreas Vohns (Department Chair Didactics of Mathematics), Annika Wille, Daniel Krenn, Angelika Wiegele (Department Chair Mathematics), Vice Dean Clemens Heuberger


This year, two colleagues at our faculty defended successfully their habilitation thesis. Daniel Krenn, Department of Mathematics, received the venia docendi in Mathematics, and Annika Wille, Department of Didactics of Mathematics, the venia docendi for Mathematics Education. The certificate was presented by the Dean Gerhard Friedrich and the Vice Dean Clemens Heuberger.

Congratulations to our young colleagues for their excellent work and contributions to the field of Mathematics and Mathematics education!

Photo: Dean Gerhard Friedrich, Andreas Vohns (Department Chair Didactics of Mathematics), Annika Wille, Daniel Krenn, Angelika Wiegele (Department Chair Mathematics), Vice Dean Clemens Heuberger

Der Beitrag On June 17, Daniel Krenn and Annika Wille received their habilitation certificate erschien zuerst auf University of Klagenfurt.

Source: AAU TEWI

Summer break borrowing: 25.07. – 03.09.2019

As usual, we offer students and external users the possibility to take out several open-shelf books for a longer period:

  • from Thursday, July 25, 2019
  • you can take out up to 6 open-shelf books,
  • until Thursday, September 3, 2019 at the latest

 

Der Beitrag Summer break borrowing: 25.07. – 03.09.2019 erschien zuerst auf University of Klagenfurt.

Source: AAU TEWI

Library’s opening hours: Main summer holidays 2019

Öffnungszeiten Bibliothek | Foto: Andrea Bem

Loan desk opening hours of the University Library during the summer break (01.07.2019 – 30.09.2019):

 

July and September:

Mon – Wed, Fri: 08:30 – 16:00
Thu: 08.30 – 19:00

August:
Mon to Fri: 08:30 – 12:00

Saturday: closed (July – September)

Normal opening hours start: Tuesday, 01.10.2019

 

University members have unrestricted access to the library‘s reading rooms.

Registration for the 24-hour library is possible via the campus system under “My settings” >> 24-hour library.
Please register at least one day before you plan to use this service for the first time. Accounts are activated every day at midnight.

Please use our self-service kiosks and the automatic return drop box when loan desk is closed!

 

 

 

Der Beitrag Library’s opening hours: Main summer holidays 2019 erschien zuerst auf University of Klagenfurt.

Source: AAU TEWI